Friday, April 12, 2013

Pack it up, pack it up, pack it up!

We are moving to a new house in exactly two weeks, and I've finally accepted that I have to pack about 100 boxes in that time. (To be fair, Nick will do the majority, but I will complain the most and take the most credit.)  I've been given many warnings of "Don't overdo it," "No heavy lifting," and "You have to think of the baby." No problem!  I need more encouragement to actually start this task than to avoid it!  I've been successfully avoiding it for weeks.

I did some research on finding motivation to pack up the house. Isn't internet research the procrastinator's best friend? My favorite bits of advice (useful enough to write down) were obvious, but they filled up a page in my notebook and helped me waste a little time. The real motivator is designating my rewards for each little bit of packing: filling one box, filling a garbage bag, filling a bag for donation, and filling a box of books to sell.

Happily, I packed one box just now, and I am now being rewarded with an episode of Game of Thrones. See -- I'm not afraid to take it slow.

My greatest hope is to purge a lot of clutter and not take anything useless to the new house. I know this will present me with many sentimental dilemmas, like the following:

My brother gave me this No Fear t-shirt in high school. I think he had one that said "WILL RACE FOR FOOD." You can tell it's ragged, but you can't see how frayed and unwearable it is. I had to make the choice to put it in the garbage bag or the fabric scrap bag. At first I thought I would just take a picture and toss it, but no!  It's saved, maybe for another 20 years.

I have a feeling it will end up framed in my baby's room, signaling the trouble we are all facing this coming 20 years.

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Diabetic and pregnant

I feel like I have an opportunity to demystify and unscarify one of my biggest concerns about this endeavor: being diabetic and pregnant.

I won’t begin to try to explain the difference between Type 1, Type 2, and gestational diabetes, or the risks they cause in pregnancy. It is enough to say I have Type 2, and have been schooled for years by my endocrinologist I would need insulin if I got pregnant. I was only 3.5 weeks when I saw the Dr. and started insulin.

My diabetes has always been fairly well controlled, and I’ve been rather relaxed about it – taking my medicine, but eating what I feel like and not checking my blood sugar consistently. That changed in an instant. Now I check my blood sugar seven times a day and inject insulin four times a day. I have to really think about what I’m eating because I can see immediately what effect it has. If I’m doing my job, my blood sugar stays within the target range all day long, which I can only know by testing every time I’m supposed to.

Here’s the thing I did not anticipate about this big lifestyle change: it wasn’t hard. It has been something I could control -- a good thing I could do for myself and the Fig – in a crazy sea of uncertain circumstances. I know I am merely at the beginning of this job, and blood sugar control will become more important (and possibly more difficult) as the months go by. However, I know now the unfortunate combination of diabetes and pregnancy is not necessarily devastating. That said, I'm sure it is hard for a lot of women, especially those who have trouble with blood sugar control or those who slammed with the reality of gestational diabetes when they haven't had to worry about it before.